Solemn Thoughts on Veterans’ Day (Remembrance Day/ Armistice Day)

The eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month, this was the moment when the Generals and Marshals of the Great War signed Armistice that ended the fighting.  November 11, Armistice Day, is still observed throughout Europe.  Around the British Commonwealth, subjects and citizens observe it as Remembrance Day.  In 1954, U. S. President Eisenhower signed a law changing the day’s title, in the U. S., to Veterans’ Day.  Thus, it became more than just a day to commemorate the Armistice and remember our war dead, but a day honor all Veterans of all wars and those served to keep the peace.

One certainly calls to mind all those fought on Continents and sub-Continents and islands, in Theaters of War and Theaters of Operations, on the High Seas and in the Skies above, all who gave the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of others not just in the Great War, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, but also OIF, OEF (including Afghanistan, Trans-Sahara, the Philippines, and other places).

On this day let us remember and honor the sacrifice of all who fought and died for freedom and all who kept the peace.  Let us also pause and shake hands with and thank those Veterans still among us.

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The opinions expressed in my writings are my own, unless otherwise cited or attributed, and not necessarily those of my employers.

One thought on “Solemn Thoughts on Veterans’ Day (Remembrance Day/ Armistice Day)

  1. Anyone who wears, or has worn, the uniform of the U.S. has joined
    a very special club. It is a privilege to belong to this 1%; what is (and has been) shared cannot always be put into words; it is only deeply felt and shared with those who were on the left and the right; but never forget-
    ting who we were and who we
    served.

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